Upto 25,000 Barrels Found In Dump Site In Pacific Ocean !!

insecticides

There are almost 25,000 waste barrels found near the pacific ocean. Marine scientists found 25,000 barrels containing the insecticide DDT. Insecticides were dumped near South California in Catalina island, where there is a cumbersome waste water site build during world war II.

Insecticides Found Near Dump Site In Santa Catalina

insecticides

Research vessels, starting sailing from Santa Catalina Island to record the images from the underground surface of the pacific ocean. The crew found highly corroded barrels that were into the sea bed of the coast of Los Angeles.

Scientists started digging up to find more barrels and used two sonar robots to gather all the images. They described the event as counting stars in a milky way. It took two weeks surveying the whole seabed, but they couldn’t find any end to it. The seafloor was as large as the San Francisco city, and they have examined the complete area in two weeks. The mapped area was 36,000 acres full of toxic chemicals and insecticide barrels.

“I was pretty shocked that it just kept extending as far as it did,” said Eric Terrill of UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, who led the mission of 31 scientists and crew members. “We couldn’t keep up with the flow of data coming in.”

South California shipping logs concluded that most industries use the ocean and sea beds as their dumping grounds. The Ocean Dumping Act is also known as Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act was enacted.

Why Does It Matter?

Earlier marine scientists have detected a high level of DDT in marine animals like dolphins and sea lions. These animals were affected near Catalina Island. Chemicals found in animals such as sea lions could be the cause of cancer.

Scientists researched the 36,000 acres of the seafloor from march 12 to march 24. It was a collaboration between the research team from Scripps with NOAA. Professor Diana Aga of the University of Buffalo said that if the barrels are sealed with no chemicals like DDT leaking from them, then the seabed is safe. The researchers can lift the barrels back from the ocean.

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